Whale Watching Tips in Australia

Whale watching tips in Australia

As the weather starts to cool down in Australia and the beaches begin to empty, tourists head to the sea to witness one of the most marvellous sights in the world. A migration of whales takes place in the Land Down Under between May and November. Whales usually travel to the warmer waters of the Great Barrier Reef to the Great Australian Bight and the coast of Western Australia during these months. For the best whale-watching experience, book a car hire at VroomVroomVroom to help you get from one destination to another.

Best places to see whales

Humpback whale jumping out from the water in Byron bay
  1. Blue whales can be easily spotted on the coast of  as its numbers slowly return from being hunted nearly to extinction. The blue whale is the largest animal on the planet and weighs an average of 180 tonnes with an average length of 33 meters. Seeing this whale up close is truly a humbling experience and one that can be a little frightening due to its immense size.
  2. Blue whales can be easily spotted on the coast of Western Australia as its numbers slowly return from being hunted nearly to extinction. The blue whale is the largest animal on the planet and weighs an average of 180 tonnes with an average length of 33 meters. Seeing this whale up close is truly a humbling experience and one that can be a little frightening due to its immense size.
  3. Killer whales, false killer whales, as well as sei and fin whales can be seen on the east coast of Australia during the humpback migration.
  4. Humpback whales are the most observed along the eastern & western coasts.
  5. The Southern right whale is common along the South Coast and through the Bight. Minke whales are also spotted during the migration period.
  6. Migaloo is an extremely rare albino whale which was first spotted in 1991. Its colour of pure white makes it easy to spot. Its return to the East Coast each year is celebrated by all those who live along the coast.

How to get the best view

  1. By the sea: Whale watching charters  are the best way to see the whales as you truly get to appreciate the size of the animal. Charters are available in numerous coastal areas. If you are taking your own vessel into the area where whales are migrating, there are regulations that stipulate how to approach the whales.
  2. By land: Grab a good set of binoculars and head on the following Australian shores:
  • Cape Naturaliste in Western Australia
  • Logan Beach in Warrnambool
  • Byron Bay in New South Wales
  • Point Danger in Queensland
  • The Whitsunday Islands in the Great Barrier Reef
  • North Stradbroke Island near Brisbane

How to prepare for whale-watching

Camera and binocular in the car seat for whale watching

  1. Eat breakfast before getting on the boat to avoid getting sick. Make sure to choose the right food like cereals, bread or crackers and avoid oily and fatty food.
  2. Keep hydrated by drinking lots of water. Make sure to avoid drinks that are high in sugar.
  3. If you are prone to motion sickness, take a tablet before getting on the boat. In case you still feel sick, sit outside and get some fresh air. Try to stare at the horizon and avoid tilting your head.

Things to bring

Here are some of the things that you may need on your whale-watching adventure:

  1. Binoculars
  2. Warm clothes or blanket
  3. Sunnies or sunscreen
  4. Camera or video recorder
  5. Sneakers or any rubbersoled shoes
  6. Food and drinking water

We hope that these tips would help you on your next whale-watching trip in Australia. If you have other useful information, please share them in the comment box below.

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